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20100101
20100131
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 45
WETA 23
WMPT (PBS) 15
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English 83
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the united states, i have to be honest with you. i love the united states, i admire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested here. >> yes, the united states is the leader of the world. it's going to be the leader of the world for many years to come. forget china's going to come out you're down. >> rose: that means? >> when you have a country has $14 trillion of cumulative debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competing, that's not good. >> rose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeable fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic vices that hit you badly and it was contagious, things are not we were there but you can get out of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bin talal for the hour next. ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. he's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him as one of the world's 25 most wealthiest people. "time" magazine
with you. i love thenited states, i mire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested he. >> yes,the united states is t leader of the world. it's going to be t leader of the world formany years to come. forget china's going to come out you'reown. >> rose: thameans? >> when you have a coury has $14 trillion of cumulive debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competin that's not good. >> rose: debt or d.p.? >> yes. and wn youave a buet deaf sit of a trillion dolrs going for the foreseeable fuer, it's unacceptable. when you he economic vices that hit youadly and it was contagious, things a not we were the but you can get o of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bi talal for the ur next. ( coca-cola 5-note mmonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communicaons from our studios in w york city, is is charlie rose. rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. 's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him asne of the wod's 25ost wlthiest ople. "tim mazine dubbed him the arabian warren buett. his fi has major stakes in banks, hotel and mea coanies. his largest vestment is i
, fancially, with the crisis you'r in rit now, new a mess. new a mess in t united states, i have to be hones with you. i love the united states, admire the united ates. >> rose: a you're heavily invested here. >>es, the united stateis the leader othe world. it's gng to be the leader of the wod for many years to come. foet china's goin to come out you're down. rose: that means? >> when yohave a country has $14 trilli of cumulative debt anits g.d.p. around $14 millioand both competing, that's notood. >>ose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeab fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic ces that hit you badly andt was contagio, things are not we were the but you can get o of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bi talal for the ur next. ( coca-cola 5-note mmonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communicaons from our studios in w york city, is is charlie rose. rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. 's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him asne of the wod's 25ost wlthiest ople. "tim mazine dubbed him th
you have to speak to it? >> oh, sure, yes, i do. gularly. here in the united states, in europe and in the middle east. that assertion is based on the assumption that the united states cannot at the same time be totally committed to israel's security-- which we are-- and be totally committed to the creation of the palestinian state-- which we are. and i believe that those are not mutually exclusive. to the contrary, that i believe they are mutually reinforcing. it will help israel get security for its people if the palestinians have a state and this issue is over. >> rose: george mitchell for the hour. next. if you've had a coke in the last 20 years, ( screams ) you've had a hand in giving college scholarships... and support to thousands of our nation's... most promising students. ♪ ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george mitchell is here. he is president obama's special envoy to the middle east, the former maine senator and majority leader has a proven record of brokerin
him into the united states and britain. so this is the kind of threat where it's maybe an individual now rather than in one particular cell that al qaeda can utilize in this type of aircraft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinished work today-to-do for the obama administration in reforming the way intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for looking at the problem of signal to noise in the system, wrefb information is shared, how do you distinguish reliable and important information from false reporting and misleading reporting. there's... anyone who works in the system who deals with threat reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noise, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's in great chaos at the moment. there's a civil war in the north draining off a lot of military resources at the moment. there's a separate insurgency which is increasingly violent in the south. the government is running out of money as it loses oil exports and so i think wha
on iran might precipitate a wider third war for the united states in the greater middle eastnd we couldn't afford that. we thought the smartest strategy was to build up sanctions, sport for sanctions against iran and we'll see that, i think, play out in real life over the next couple of months. we wanted to shine a bright light and a stronger light on the human-rights abuses of the iranian government. we wanted to draw a military cordon around iran to contain it and the united states, i think, is in a good position to do that. and we wanted to play for the long-term because we wanted... we didn't want to do anything that would movement in iran and we thought the early use of force might effectively kill that opposition movement. and so in playing for the long term, we assume that there is some kind of solution here short of the use of u.s. military force. that is the hand we played that happens to be my own view as well. >> rose: all right. let me go to gary, the iranian hand. which has been influenced, obviously, by the political turmoil after the election. was that factored in or did t
resistence did you run into trying to accomplish it? >> well, charlie, we felt that the united states was actually in better shape now than it was a year ago. president obama, we felt, had done more to advance the agenda because he has essentially put the iranians on the defenve. and the iranians are more isolated now than they were when president obama was negotiating. so we were playing for the long term in the simulated game. the american team that i lead was trying to position all of our friends and partners to put greater pressure on the iranians. we wanted very much to avoid an early israeli use of force because while we are very sympathetic, of course, to the israeli predictment, we felt that an israeli attack on iran might precipitate a wider third war for the united states in the greater middle east and we couldn't afford that. we thought the smartest strategy was to build up sanctions, sport for sanctions against iran and we'll see that, i think, play out in real life over the next couple of months. we wanted to shine a bright light and a stronger light on the human-rights a
you are president of the united states. that doesn't work when you come into washington d.c. and you have people like nancy pelosi and harry reid and politicians on the hill that will call your-- claw your eyes out if you stand still. he has not asserted himself. he has not been the barack obama of iowa. i keep waiting for the barack obama of iowa. >> rose: what was the barack obama of iowa reasons barack obama of iowa was a guy that reached out to republicans and to independents who would come in to me, when we were going around iowa doing our show there during the caucus saying you know what, this guy isn't wedded to all of those fights and those ideaological battles that bill clinton and hillary clinton and george w. bush fought from 1968 on. he's going to take us forward. the problem is he has turned his presidency over, over the past year, to people whose political careers were framed that way. i think he's going to have to stop being the law professor, start being the leader. i think he's going to start being more lbj. >> rose: back to you for health care, adam. is health-care
full time members of my staff. some in lonn, some in the united states. we used our proper names, told our back grounds. the people we met with, counter parties on the russian side used phony names. one was stations in seattle, silicon valley, one in washington. so, the game that got played is to thwart anything we would do. this is the group we had to work with. there we are looking in the open source trying to gain the cooperation from these other people, where we got absolutely nowhere. they played with us. but what did work is a lot of people came forward with information. some accurate, some inaccurate. so you have to parse through it. >> charlie: what was the most interesting information that came forward? >> the single most intriguing were a series of commodity related businesses that traded off getting commodities out of russia. things like a moa pneumonia, fertilizer. these were basic money laundering operations for them. they operated all over the world. when these things happen some of it always sticks to of the people responsible for distributing it. it doesn't all go to th
reform for the financial sector in the united states and around the world also stimulated sessions, president obama sent one of his top economic advisors larry summers, chairman of the council of economic advisors, the office that coordinates economic policy for the president. he previously served as treasury secretary dure the clinton administration as well as president of harvard university. i interviewed him early this evening at the conference center but before we show you that interview, president obama met house republicans today in baltimore. he did an interesting exchange with them and here is a look at some of the dialogue. >> if you were to listen to the debate, and frankly how some of you went after this bill, you would think that this thing was some bolshevik plot. i means that's how you guys... that's how you guys presented it. and so i am thinkg to myself, well, how is it that a plan that is pretty centrist, look, i mean, i'm just saying, i know you guys digree. but if you look at the facts of the bill, most independent observers would say this is actually what many r
has and most importantly visas that will get h into the unite states a britain. so this ishe kind ofhreat whe it's maybe individual now rather than inne particularcell th al qaeda cantilize in ts type of aircft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinishedork today-to-do for the oba administration in reforming the w intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for loong at the probm of signal to noise in the syst, wrefb information is shared, howo you distinguish reliable and important informatio from fae reporting and misleading reporting. ere's... anyone who works in e system who dls with that reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noi, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's inreat chaos at t moment. there's a civil wa in the north draining off a l ofmilitary resources at e moment. there's a separate surgency which increasgly violent in the uth. the govement is running o of moneas it loses oi export and so i think what the u.s. needs to do is rea
is a ry important word. no other country including the united states recognizes that annexization neitr do the palestinians. but for tsraelis, what theye building in is part of israel. the others don't see it that wa so you have thes wily divergent perspectives on the subject. our view is let's get into negotiations. let's deal with the issues and co up with the solion to all of them including jusalem which will be exedingly difficult but many my judgmen possible. the iselis are no going to stop settlements in... or construction in east jerusalem. theyon't regard that a settlement because they ink it's part of iael. >> rose: people recogniz the annexation. how many count please? to the bestf my knowlee, there aren't any immediaty after the annexion thunited nations... >> rose: so you're going to let them go aad evenhough no one recognizes t annexation. >> you say "let them g ahead." it's what ey regards their country. they don't say there letting us go ahead when we build in manhattan. rose: but dot international rules have somethingo do with what somebody cando to define as their countr
you soon. joining me from washington is haiti's ambassador to the united states raymonalcide i'm happy to have you here. >> glad to be back. >> charlie: tell us what you know. >> what i know is what everybody else know except that i talked with some friends and people back home who add a few touches. we have in haiti today the greatest tragedy that the country has seen in years. and after they finish counting the dead and burying them, we'll start rebuilding, i hope. then we'll take years to heal. >> charlie: because of the loss of life. >> yes. >> charlie: there's some hope that this will bring attention to the world community will understand the struggle of haiti and perhaps there will be an outpouring but none of that can ca the pain of the loss of life. >> i think there's a silver lining what you say. that the world perhaps finally will start focusing on haiti, the country. the second independent country, the western hemisphere, second only to the united states of america, country that helped so many others, including the united states. and that helped south america to be delibe
is where do you send these them? if you send them the united states, dollar series of complicated legal questions that arise. how long can you hold them the united states? if you can't deport them someplace elsedo you have to release them the united states? that would be a horrible outcome. and i think one of the questions that is a legitimate question is what is the plan in terms ofall of the legal framework that applies if there comes a point that people come into the united states and have to be held there. so those are legitimate issues to discuss which, frankly, go somewhat beyond the particular elements of the december 25 plot. >> rose: with respect to the president'seer on terrorism and the president's definition, john brennan has the president's ear, he's the point person for this president in defining the war against terrorism? >> he is, it's one of the reasons the president has asked mr. brennan to conduct this review of what happened o christmas day. he has his u.s. most respect and loyalty and respect for his service so he without a doubt is a point person. it's why the pres
has and most importantly visas that will get him into the united states and britain. so this is t kind of teat wher it's maybe an individual now rather than in o particular ll thatl qaeda can ulize in thi type of aircra attack. there's still a lot of unfinished wk today-to-do for the obamadministration in reforming the way intelligence is sharednside the u.s. bureaucracy for looki at the probleof signal to noise in the system wrefb information is shared, how d youistinguish reliable and important information from fals reporting andisleading reporting. the's... anyone who works in thsystem who dea with thre reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. d even if you share the noise, that doesn't actuallyreate the clarity you need to actgainst real threats. >> yemen is a country's in gat chaos at theoment. there's a civil war in thenorth draining off a lot of litary resources at thmoment. there's aeparate inrgency which is increasiny violent in the soh. the governnt is running out of money it loses oil exports and so ithink what the u.s. needs to do is rea
weapons or nuclear developmen but we ren't willing to just give it up. and basically the united states policfrom the beginning has been eith do nothing or we're going to come after you. and the reality is they coulnever put together with the russians and the chinese and otrs, they can't get engh people to along. >> rose: swhen you hear th, you say what? >> well, think i have a major disagreement th gary. because in the simulated game that we played, we did reach out tohe iraans. we asked f negotiations and re turned down. so i d't think 's correct on that accoun would also say that this simulati, it'sery diicult to simulate a real life environment. th was a compressed timetabl it didn't take aount of everything tha president obama has tried to dover the last year. and at is to reach o to the iranns and he has been turned down in tha so if you are trng to aw some larger conclusns from this very brief simulation, i think it is inaccurate to say that sehow american policy is just more of the same. i thk president oa has actuallydvanced american policy and he h built up some capital nowith
will have the full support of the united states in the urgent effort to rescue those trapped beneath the rubble and to deliver the humanitarian relief, the food, water, and medicine that haitians will need in the coming days. >> rose: joining me by satellite phone is cnn's anderson cooper. he was in port-au-prince, haiti. just tell me what you're seeing and at people are telling you. >> i don't know much of the [no audio] because it's hard to get sort of [no audio] and i can tell you i got here early this morning really on one of the first helicopter flights in and the situation in downtown port-au-prince, which is where i've been traveling around the last... most of this day, is incredibly dire. right now we've just felt two sizable aftershocks and every time... i'm in downtown port-au-prince right now. every time you feel an aftershock you can hear people start to scream in these public parks where they are camping out and have been camping out since the first earthquake hit. just about... i don't think it's high personly to say every block you go down in downtown port-au-prince yo
rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with an ongoing look at the united states intelligence community. over the weekend c.i.a. director leon panetta publicly defended his agent industry criticism over last month's suicide attack in afghanistan that killed seven of his employees. in an editorial in the "washington post," panetta dismissed claims that agents had practiced poor trade craft. the public defse came days after president obama acknowledged security missteps that led to al qaeda's attempt to bring down a u.s. airliner on christmas day. in addition, the military's highest-ranking intelligence officer in afghanistan released a critical self-assessment last week. major general michael flynn wrote that analysis was unable to understand and answer fundamental questions about the war. joining me now from washington, david ignatius, he's a columnist in for the "washington post." he also covers the intelligence community and writing novels about it. in berkeley, california, bob baer, former c.i.a. officer. in new york, mark mazzetti of the "new york times." he covers national security issue
is failure. united states is fled cotry. it's a fail ste. it's a failed constition. in fact the constitutiohas been taken away. >> charliewait a nute. you just sit here and said with great clarity homuch you admireheresident for his intelligence. >> i didn't finish my sentence. right my sentence is: he takes for granite that war is our normal ate. well, i'm not saying heikes . i rather think being an intelligentan who s read a bookr two doesn't like it. but he's up against a media that is going o about our boys a in has way. we can do anything to disturb them in harms way. all of is jk being fed to the people has made us a jky pele. theyon't know anything. don't you get the estion i get all th time. who,do you read that? w do you know what is going on? i id well i had the luck to live five orix years in europe. the newsper are betr abo american news than os. you never ar when you he generaelectric owning nbc. khafrplt of. >>> charlie: ey're selling the war. >> they're sellinghe war. you never getruth out of them. >> charlie: prident gets criticis from some places because hea
is the united states and china... >>e're not doingwell. rose: the people at copenhagen. >> wl, they didn't do it. they didn't do it at all. the only substantial agreement coming out of copenhagen is on avoided defore station. whicis a good sp. but now it has to be fued. peop have to step up to the plate. and what we're talking about here is the remaining tropical fores which are mostly in the trical belt around thequator are some of theost underdeveloped cntries in the world. we need the snding forest to clean thair. >> rose: right. >> the pnet needs that. as well, these forests are... the reserirs are some of the last remaining biodiversity complicated interrelated sections of biological life. if those peoe are not... do not ve anoth economic incentive, they're going to have to cut the trees a sell them to... >>ose: or for fue or something else. >> and what they do ishey cut the trees and they pla low-eld crops, subsistence rming. and then they burn t crop redues and that... the... and they burn theforest as well to ear the lan th process accounts for mething like 20% of the greenhou gasmission
and certainlyagging behind the united states, noto speak of china. >> that's ght. we do ha a problem. the recovery sluggish. and very slow starting. anas well as being in the deficit, we've g to roll up our sleev and get thingsoing again. get people investing again. we will be setting out next week proper plans for economic growth. things like sayg annew business that setsp, people wanting to employ people, those are the sts we should take, but at the heart of it, this problem of the defit, ot on epts, the britishgovernment have rather been putting ofand saying don't worry, we'll deal with it lat, we believe actually that you are getting recovery d dealing with the defit aren alternativeshey go together. >>ose: stimuting the economy e wrong way to go. >> well, the biggest stimulus t economy has received a continuous to receivis from the low-interest rates and from a relativy active monetary policy. our great fear if you don't deal with the deficit, interest rates wl start to go up. we've en thi in greece where the intertional community took fright at the start of the greek econy. their intest ra
the full supportf the united states in the urgent effort to scue those trappedeneath the rubble a to deliver the humanitarian rief, the food, wate and medicin that haitians wilneed in the coming days. >> rose: joining me byatellite phe is c's aerson cooper. was in port-au-prie, haiti. just tl me what you're seeing and what people are telling y. >> i don't know much o the [no audi because it's hard to get sortf [no audio] and i can tell y i got here early this morning really o one of the firs helicopter flights in d the situation in downtown port-au-prince, which where i've been traveling around the last. most ofhis day, is incredibly dire. right now we've just felt two sizable aftershocks and ery me... i'm in downtown port-au-prince right now. evertime you feel an aftehock you can hear people start to scream in these public parks where they e camping out and haveeen caing out since the first earthquake hit. justbout... i don't thinkit's gh personly to say every block you go down in downtow po-au-prince you see bodies on the side ofhe road on the streets and often th relatives a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)